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New Reality TV Show "Foreclosure"

By Dan Geddes

HOLLYWOOD—The NBS network has announced production of a new hour long reality TV Show Foreclosure, which pays ordinary foreclosure victims to appear on the show. Executive Producer John Stallman describes Foreclosure as “giving Middle Americans with TV’s a chance to see how they will suffer if they ever even think about stepping out of line.”

Critics had mixed review of the new offering. ABC called Foreclosure, a “sympathetic portrait of the pain now being suffered by Americans being foreclosed upon."

FOX noted that the: “Despite the host’s superficial sensitivity about the plight of the victims, the Foreclosure camera feels voyeuristic as it follows the police throwing families out of their homes, heaping their tacky consumer possessions on the lawn."

The first episode followed the Jones’ family all the way from the pinnacle of their $750,000 home down to living as homeless people in a tent city just outside Boston.

Despite the superficial sympathy, Foreclosure also insinuates that the Jones’ overextended themselves financially and thus brought their misery upon themselves.

The Foreclosure pilot also featured an episode about the California multi-millionaire, William Carcassone, whose $1.6 million house dropped in value to $950,000. Carcassone just stopped making payments, seeing it as just another bad investment decision. Banks are hesitant to foreclose on millionaires fearing they have the resources to drag out the foreclosure process.

NBC summed it up: "Despite the sympathetic background music playing in the background whenever foreclosure victims appear on screen, the overall impact of Foreclosure is that of the boot of corporatocracy stomping on a human face again and again. The Message? There's not a damn thing you can do about it."

Viewers reported a sick fascination with the show, but found it oddly compelling. "It's like watching a car accident".